Stewarts Production Adventures Yr1

Learning how to be good at production

SND 5: More Mics and feedback

Boundry Mic

Boundary-Microphone

The Boundry mic is a condenser mic that is on the floor or on side tables. This is for groups speaking/singing (Ambient). It is used at a distance so it can pick up more sounds than a regular mic. But it can also pick up other sounds nearby.

Float Mic

Float mics

These are used on the floor and are also for ambient sounds.

Fly Mic

Like Boundry and Float miss but they hang from the ceiling (Or I presume, a bar)

Condenser microphones have a narrow pick up pattern, so things you don’t want it to pick up like a speaker, you keep out of it’s pickup. That doesn’t mean that it still won’t pick up other sounds though, like feedback.

You can reduce the feedback by using a graphic equaliser (G.E). A G.E can’t get rid of it though.

Graphic_equalizer

On the G.E there are lots of frequencies from very low to very high. The feedback usually happens in the middle range.

  1. Insert the external processor (Red is input, white is output)
  2. Turn the sound on the mixing desk up until you hear feedback
  3. Estimate which frequency to eliminate (Getting rid of the frequency will get rid of all sounds in that frequency, not just feedback.)
  4. Turn it down.

You know you’ve got it right when if you turn it down, the feedback stops straight away. Some near it may turn down slowly, but that doesn’t mean it is the right one.

Then you repeat the process because there will be more than one frequency. Usually they are in octaves so they will be in a pattern. If you move the microphone then you will have to start all over again. Don’t bother with mics that will be moved all the time during performance, just the stationary ones.

The problem with getting rid of frequencies is that you are getting rid of frequencies! So you can’t do it too much or there will be too many gaps in the sound and it will sound bad!

Q Lab

I finally programmed on Q Lab. When saving the BBC library CD files onto memory sticks, we did it on PC. Unfortunatly on the PC, it doesn’t save the file type so we had to redo it on a Mac.

Here is a redo of the cue list.

  1. Crowds – Track 6– Busy Restaurant – International chatter, waiters – loud – Play over 1, fade during 2
  2. Bang! – Electric Alarm – loud – fade during 4
  3. Fade out 1
  4. Dial 999 – Police car arrives with siren, idle, switch off – loud, played over 3 and stops before 5 – No fade out
  5. Fade out 2
  6. Hospitals – Heartbeat – 58 per minute, average for fit young person – quieter – over 1 only – No fade outs
  7. Bang! – Sniper, single shot from a position 10 feet away – loud over 1 only – No fade outs
  8. Stop 6

I got rid of the St James Park track because I didn’t realise it had talking on it and would have played over the busy restaurant.

When I played it I was a little disoriented, especially with the timing. I forgot to consider how long 6 would be. But I used get used to doing this.

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This entry was posted on November 6, 2013 by in Sound and tagged , , , , , .
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